Hyundai Canada Recalling 140,000 Vehicles For Hood Latch, Parking Brake Faults

2015 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport

Hyundai Canada has announced a corrosion-related recall of close to 140,000 vehicles to fix faulty hood latches and parking brake warning lights switches that could fail.

The hood latch campaign is the larger of the two, covering nearly 129,000 SUVs including the 2013 through 2017 Hyundai Santa Fe Sport and three-row Santa Fe crossovers sold between 2013 and 2017. In those cars, the secondary hood latch cable can rust and prevent the latch from closing, a condition that would allow the hood to fly open if the main hood catch failed while the vehicle is at speed. Hyundai says its dealers will replace the cable.

In the other recall, roughly 12,000 2015 and 2016 Hyundai Sonata and 2015 and 2016 Hyundai Genesis sedans from 2015 and 2016 have a parking brake warning light switch that is also prone to corrosion. A rusty switch will fail to light the parking brake indicator in the gauge cluster, increasing the chance of the car being driven with the parking brake engaged. Again, dealers will replace the switch. Note that the Genesis models affected are older Hyundai-branded sedans, not the newer models launched in 2017 as part of the Genesis luxury brand’s spin-off.

Hyundai issued similar recalls in the U.S., but that 600,000-vehicle campaign is relatively small given the higher sales the brand enjoys in the more populous U.S. market, which suggests this is a regional campaign focusing on colder parts of the continent.

This is not the first time Hyundai has recalled vehicles for faulty hood latches or rust-related issues. Last summer, it recalled Tucson SUVs to replace hood latches, and Sonata, Elantra and Santa Fe models for rusty springs.

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Chris Chase

Chris Chase

As a child, Chris spent much of his time playing with toy cars in his parents’ basement; when his mother would tell him to go play outside, he made car sounds while riding his bicycle or dug roads for his toys in the flower garden. Now he gets to indulge his obsession playing with real cars that make their own cool noises, and gets paid for it.